Reading at Barton Moss 

Please scroll to the bottom to find out about reading in every class

 Ofsted Education Inspection Framework September 2019

'A rigorous approach to the teaching of develops learners' confidence and enjoyment in reading. At the early stages of learning to read, reading materials are closely matched to learners' phonics knowledge'. 

'Children read widely and often, with fluency and comprehension'.

'Reading is prioritised to allow pupils to access the full curriculum offer'. 

BM Reading Policy 

BM Library Policy

Teaching Reading During English Lessons

There are two dimensions to our programmes of study for reading at Barton Moss:

  • word reading

  • comprehension

Teaching reading focuses on developing pupils` competence in both reading and comprehension. It is essential that by the end of their primary education all pupils are able to read fluently and with confidence and are reading to learn across the curriculum. 

Phonics

The early stages of learning to read are taught through a structured phonics programme from entry in the Nursery. The children are taught in small groups which are tailored to their individual needs and detailed assessments take place every 5 days to monitor progress and adjust groups as necessary. Individualised programmes are designed for any child who is falling behind based on this analysis of gaps in their phonics learning

The phonics programme in Y1 builds upon pupils’ existing knowledge of synthetic phonics from Reception and helps them to develop a significant vocabulary of words. Best of all, it encourages a love of reading since our 'Roots' programme uses a rich variety of teacher-read books.

How the Y1 phonics programme is structured

The daily phonics programme is built around four basic components:

  1. Letters and Sound Association - Pupils' phonemic awareness is built by using colourful mnemonic pictures, integrated with alliterative phrases, sounds, and letter cues. Fun elements, such as games, ensure it remains enjoyable, as the fast-paced systematic instruction reviews and introduces sounds and their written representations.

  2. Shared Stories - Vibrant storybooks engage pupils in practicing their decoding, fluency, and comprehension skills. New vocabulary is introduced and then pupils are supported as they decode the story with their partners. Whole-class discussions encourage higher-level thinking skills. These stimulate pupils' oral language and cognitive development as they become confident, enthusiastic readers.

  3. Story Telling and Retelling - A collection of 48 books, both fiction and non-fiction used. These are read interactively with pupils as part of daily lessons. Using partner talk and response, pupils' early skills of predicting, clarifying and questioning are developed to support the development of effective reading strategies.

  4. Writing - In addition to a daily supported short writing task pupils are regularly guided through a longer writing activity which is related to the theme of both the Shared Story and STaR books. Pupils think, speak, and work collaboratively with others as they go through the writing process.

Y2 and KS2

Our Y2 and KS2 Reading programme, taught through an extended English lesson, enables pupils to enjoy reading and creates fluent, confident readers. We use a wide range of carefully selected literature including fiction, non-fiction and poetry. In most cases, pupils read the whole book, giving them all important ‘reading stamina’. 

We also teach Reading Comprehension skills as a separate lesson in the afternoons three times a week. 

Independent Reading Practice

 

The Barton Moss Library

All of the children in Barton Moss love to choose books to take home from our library, either to read as their reading book or as an `Extra Book` to read on their own or to share with a parent to foster a love of reading, expand their knowledge or satisfy their own curiosity. Infants can choose from a wide range of fiction and non-fiction picture books in the main library area. Y2 and Y3 have their own class library linked to the Junior Librarian system. Once children are confident readers, they are able to choose from an ever increasing range of both fiction and non-fiction books in the main library area. The library has been organised using the Dewey library classification system and is open every lunchtime for returning and choosing new books. Every member of Y5 is a librarian and they do a terrific job keeping the library looking inviting.                                                                                                                                      

Please follow the link to view how twenty minutes reading a day can impact your child. 

Reading In Nursery

Reading in Nursery is a lot of fun. We read different books every day and do various activities based on the stories, such as acting out 'Going on a Bear Hunt', making porridge for the Three Bears and finding out what would keep Humpty Dumpty from not cracking when he falls off the wall. ​All of this is learning is also reinforced in the continuous provision where a child can go into the reading area and read a self chosen book, and when they go to the school library to choose a book to share at home.

Alongside this we also teach early phonics skills which help to develop the children's listening, vocabulary and speaking skills. Phase 1 phonics develops the children's awareness of sounds from environmental and instrumental sounds to what sounds they can hear in simple words such as 'dog'. Typical phase 1 activities include 'listening' walks, playing and identifying instruments and playing games like I Spy. We also teach the children the letter sounds of the alphabet and they learn the action and the song for each letter that is provided by Jolly Phonics.

Reading in Reception

In Reception children begin to read using their phonic knowledge learning their alphabet is essential. This involves learning letter sounds and shapes, hearing and saying sounds in words in the correct order as well as being on their way to reading and writing the 44 phonemes or sounds in the English language. They also need to remember those tricky words that cannot be sounded out letter by letter e.g. said or the.

 In Reception we have a reading corner, lots of vibrant print to help children recognise letters, sounds and words in the environment. The children take part in daily phonic lessons and stories to encourage listening, reading and writing skills every day. 

A real hit in Reception is “Talk for writing sessions” which encourage children to orally act out stories which are very repetitive while having fun at the same time!

Reading in Y1

In Year 1 children continue to learn to read using phonics. Children are still learning letter sounds for reading and spelling, but these become more complex. For example, they look at the same sounds but with different spelling patterns, such as long vowel sounds, e.g. ai, ay, a-e. It’s valuable to help them with these sounds at home when you are reading together and reinforce the letter sounds from the previous year so that children start to automatically apply their phonic skills when reading unfamiliar words. Children are also expected to recognise some tricky words by sight. They continue to build up a bank of tricky sight vocabulary. Children are expected to read every night to someone at home. Their reading book is matched to their current reading ability. Children are listened to individually by the class teacher or support staff at least twice a week. In a morning children are encouraged to read their reading book as a morning activity.

A large variety of quality texts are used during English lessons plus a shared story that is linked to the star book of the week. During this time, the teacher and children read a text and children's understanding is assessed through verbal questioning or written work.​

Children are encouraged to choose a book from our school library where there is a large choice of picture books, stories and non-fiction books. These are changed regularly at the request of the individual child.

At the end of the day, the teacher shares a story where reading fluency is modelled through clear and accurate pronunciation.

Reading in Y2

In Year 2, children are expected to read every night to someone at home. They have a reading book chosen from our reading schemes which is matched to their current reading ability. Books are changed regularly, and children move up the stages as they progress. When your child has become a fluent decoder and has comprehension skills to match, they can choose their reading book from our class library. We have a large variety of stories and non-fiction books for children to choose from.

Year 2 children can also choose a library book to take home to share. They can choose from our class library or take a picture book from the school library.

There are opportunities to read throughout the day in Year 2. We read a variety of quality texts in our English lessons to practice our reading strategies and we aim to read as much as possible in other subjects too.

At least three times a week we read our own reading books in class for 15 minutes. During this time the teacher listens to children read and checks they are on the correct level of book. Children are encouraged to write a book review when they have finished their book to share their thoughts on the text.

At the end of the day the teacher shares a story with the class modelling fluent and expressive reading. This is a lovely way to end our day.

Reading in Y3

In Year 3, children read independently every night and books are changed when the children have finished them. Some children in Year 3 are reading books from the reading scheme, some children choose a book from the class library, whilst some children choose their books from the main school library. As well as a fiction book ot scheme reading book, children are encouraged to choose non-fiction books that link to the Year 3 curriculum. These may be chosen from the school library or from the selection on display that is in the classroom.

Each day during the English lesson, a child is chosen randomly to speak in front of the class about their reading book. They usually speak for a couple of minutes and then the teacher or the rest of the class ask the speaker questions about their book.

There are reading opportunities in English lessons. Reading may be modelled by the class teacher, sometimes the children read in pairs, they may all read as a class or they may read individually and then questioned to check the understanding of what they have read.

In the afternoon, reading comprehension takes place three times per week. During this time, the children read a text which links to the Key Stage 2 reading domains and answer a variety of questions. 

At the end of the day, the children listen to a story which is read by the teacher. Reading fluency is modelled through clear and accurate pronunciation and intonation and children's understanding is assessed through verbal questioning. Where possible, the story links to the curriculum.

Reading in Y4

In Y4, children read independently every night and books are changed on a regular basis. Children have two books, a fiction reading book which is appropriate for their reading age and ability and an extra book. For this additional book, children are encouraged to choose non-fiction books that link to the Y4 curriculum. 

Each day during the English lesson, a child is chosen randomly to speak in front of the class about their reading book. They usually speak for a couple of minutes and then the rest of the class ask the speaker questions about their book.

There are always reading opportunities in English lessons and reading strategies, both to clarify the pronunciation of words and also their meanings, are modelled and practised regularly.

In the afternoon, reading comprehension takes place three times per week. During this time, the children read a text which links to the KS2 reading domains and answer a variety of questions. ​

At the end of the day, the children listen to a story which is read by the teacher. Reading fluency is modelled through clear and accurate pronunciation and intonation and children's understanding is assessed through verbal questioning. Where possible, the story links to the curriculum.

Reading in Y5

There are three aspects to reading in Year 5: the first is the teaching of reading through a class text; the second is reading in subjects beyond English and the third is reading for pleasure. In class we have a range of texts which we study together.  Reading is modelled by the teacher to the class using a range of strategies and techniques. This time is also used to hear pupils read out loud from the text to judge their fluency – ensuring over a week that everyone reads out loud.

Throughout English lessons and specifically in three distinctly taught lessons reading comprehension questions will be explored, answered and ideas developed by pupils. In all aspects of the curriculum children read high quality texts/extracts to develop knowledge and vocabulary. Class displays and the school library draw to the attention of pupils` further books they can choose to borrow as their “extra book” to further develop their understanding and interest in the subjects we are studying.

Finally, reading books are a combination of books chosen by the pupil and books recommended to individuals to read by the teacher for pleasure. There is an understanding that all pupils are expected to read a minimum of thirty pages a night to build stamina, enjoyment and to become embroiled in the writing. Children write in a class log the book they are reading and have opportunity in reading assignment and Thursday morning book club reviews (part of the English lesson) to talk spontaneously about texts, share favourites and talk about their reading.

The teacher reads the opening chapters of books at the end of the day to encourage children to borrow and read a wider range of books. 

Reading in Y6

Reading in Y6 is done independently and on a daily basis in school and at home. Children are able to choose age appropriate books from our quality, well-stocked library. Pupils choose a fiction book and a non-fiction book which is usually related to the YEAR SIX curriculum or an area of interest or curiosity.

In daily English lessons, children are read to by the teacher who models reading with fluency, expression, inflection and purpose. Pupils in turn ‘read out loud’ with and to their seating partners practising their reading skills. Short bursts of reading comprehension take place within the lessons whilst taught comprehension that focuses on children developing their skills in recognising and answering domain questions accurately happens three times a week in the afternoon. Furthermore, children are encouraged to develop positive, reading habits by reading quietly and independently at the start of the day and after their lunch break.

Developing vocabulary is a key skill we encourage by trying to make sense of new words using pronunciation strategies and clues within a sentence to find out their meanings. As far as possible, we learn about the meaning of words by making links to the origin of words and their affixes (etymology).

At the end of the day, the children listen to a ‘class read’ which is read by the teacher. This is another opportunity for children to develop their understanding using a shared text.